Capture One Vs. Lightroom: The Pros and Cons of the Most Popular RAW Photo Editors - Photo.net - Articles

Capture One Vs. Lightroom: The Pros and Cons of the Most Popular RAW Photo Editors

by Hillary Grigonis  from blog.creativelive.com

A RAW photo is only a starting point — to get those pixels to a final image, you need a RAW file editor, the modern equivalent to a dark room. Adobe Lightroom is arguably the most popular choice, bundled with Photoshop as part of the Adobe Creative Cloud family. But Lightroom isn’t the only tool in the box — Capture One Pro is a similar RAW editor and file management system, made by the medium format camera company, Phase One. So what’s the difference comparing Lightroom vs. Capture One?

While Lightroom and Phase One offer many of the same tools, the two programs differ in their most advanced features, as well as their organization system and user experience. How do the two programs fare in the Lightroom versus Capture One debate? Here’s what photographers have to say about both programs.

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Custom Color Profiles

Some Capture One Pro photographers go as far to claim that their photos look better in Capture One, before even touching any of the edits. Is there any truth to that? What happens is that Capture One has individual color profiles for every camera, so that when the files are imported, you get something that’s pretty close to the preview on the back of the LCD screen.

Lightroom files, however, have a more neutral starting point. While the files look brighter and more vibrant without adjustments in Capture One, Lightroom is more neutral — after all, some photographers favor softer, more muted color palettes. Adjustment options will get similar results from both programs, but the starting point is a bit different.

Color Adjustments

Many Capture One Pro users have great things to say about the program’s color management. While Lightroom has the HSL (Hue Saturation Luminance) panel with sliders and RGB curves adjustments, Capture One has a few more ways to manipulate that color. In Capture One Pro, the color options include shadow, mid-tone and highlight (more on this article here)

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